Six Great Herbs to Really Get Your Spring Garden Cookin’

Jun 27, 2011

Spring is in the air, and you know what that means: it’s planting season! Whether you’re out on the farm or making the most of your city space, gardening is a great way to celebrate the warm weather and take in some sunshine. So get out your gardening gloves and start tilling that topsoil, because we’ve got six great herbs in mind that can really make the most of your summer recipes.

Get out your gardening gloves and start tilling that topsoil, because we’ve got six great herbs in mind that can really make the most of your summer recipes.

Basil

Basil is a tasty addition to many recipes, usually added at the last moment to keep its fresh flavor intact. It can be kept for a short time in the refrigerator, and even longer in the freezer after being quickly blanched in boiling water. No pesto recipe is complete without it!


Oregano

Unlike basil, oregano is most flavorful when dried. It’s quite aromatic and just a little bitter, and a great addition to any Italian style tomato sauce.


Mint

Mint’s aroma and taste is unmistakable, both cooling and a tiny bit spicy. It can be included in many summer salad recipes, and makes a great jelly. Grind up a sprig in your lemonade for a cool twist on a summer favorite.


Chives

A member of the onion family, chives are grown for their leaves. They can be used as a condiment to brighten up a dish, or ground up to bring a fresh and subtle onion flavor to a favorite recipe.


Dill

When you hear the word dill, pickles may come to mind. But dill does more than play a supporting role. The aromatic quality the herb adds to other foods makes it an important part of many recipes. A small teaspoon will add a tasty touch to your next picnic’s potato salad.


Parsley

Parsley is widely considered to simply be a garnish – but it is actually so much more! It makes a fantastic addition to soup stocks, and is a mild yet delicious way to bring to life any meat dish.

The best time for spring planting is after the last frost, but if your window of opportunity has closed because of an extended winter hibernation, don’t fret. Many of these herbs can be planted successfully midseason. Some can even be grown inside!